Torngat Secretariat

Have any hunters shot a banded bird?

Torngat Wildlife, Plants and Fisheries Secretariat says to report it, or send them the information from the bird(s) and they will take care of the rest for you.

They can learn a lot about Labrador geese by seeing where birds harvested were initially banded.

Just earlier this month, 3 geese with neck bands were harvested and they learned that they came from all the way from their colleagues in Greenland, who put them on this past July.

This helps to provide answers to where the Lesser geese in Nunatsiavut are coming from and with collars that will put this fall, they will even learn more where these geese are spending the rest of their year.

Pauktuutit News

Pauktuutit’s President, Geri Sharpe met with RCMP Commissioner Brenda Lucki on September 27 as part of the Pinasuqatiginniq Agreement, also known as RCMP MOA.

Sharpe said through the growth of their agreement, they are working to ensure their equitable participation. Together they have created mechanisms for Inuit Women’s advocacy, and inclusion processes of engagement, co-development, implementation, and opportunity for evaluation.

They’re partnership has evolved to include Pauktuutit’s Engagement Principle, RCMP core values and Term of Reference. The principled approach is based on mutual trust in transparent and open communication, with the shared goal reducing violence against Inuit Women, Children and gender diverse Inuit through an engaged, sensitive and culturally response poling service.

Makkovik Fish Landings

The Makkovik fish plant is winding down after a busy fishing season.

Angel Chaulk says there are 38 employees working.

She says the total amount of turbot landed this summer was 361,443 lbs.

The turbot fishery closed on Saturday, September 17.

Chaulk says they will be finishing in the fish plant this week.

NL Report Cases

The province reported 4 more deaths related to COVID-19 yesterday over the past weekend.

There were currently 13 people in the hospital, with 2 in critical care.

28 new cases were reported on Tuesday, September 27, and 39 was reported on Wednesday, September 28 yesterday.

National Day for Truth and Reconciliation

In observance of National Day for Truth and Reconciliation, a day to recognize and honour residential schools survivors and to raise awareness of the tragic legacy of residential schools, all Nunatsiavut Government offices will be closed on Friday, September 30.

Beneficiaries of the Labrador Inuit Land Claims Agreement are encouraged to wear something “orange” on September 30 in observance of the statutory holiday. It is also Orange Shirt Day – inspired by the story of First Nations author Phillis Webstad, who had her clothes, including her new orange shirt, stripped from her on her first day attending residential school when she was six-years old.

“National Day for Truth and Reconciliation is a time to reflect on what true reconciliation with Indigenous peoples really means. The orange shirt serves as a symbol of the tragedies experienced at residential schools – tragedies that should never be forgotten.”

The Nunatsiavut Government will hold National Day for Truth and Reconciliation events in each Labrador Inuit community, as well as in Happy Valley-Goose Bay. Nunatsiavut Government buildings within the Labrador Inuit Settlement Area will also be lit up with orange lights to commemorate the day.

National Truth and Reconciliation Day (Audio)

The National Day for Truth and Reconciliation is a statutory holiday for employees in the federal government and federally regulated workplaces in Canada on September 30th.

The day is intended to educate and remind Canadians about the history of residential schools, honour the victims, and celebrate the survivors.

Rutie Lampe is the Mental Health and Addictions worker with Nain DHSD.

She says there are some activities planned for tomorrow in honor of loved ones and residential school survivors.

Click here to hear more from Lampe on this event.

Birds Impacted by Fiona

Canadian Wildlife Office says it has been a busy few days for Hope for Wildlife aside from the dead and dying of seabirds.

Once Fiona cleared the along the Eastern Shore, the calls for wounded wildlife began to come in.

They were getting dozens of injured birds, and not just seabirds, there were flickers, doves, pigeons and songbirds, said Hope Swimmer, founder and director of Hope for Wildlife.

In the first 24 hours following the storm, the rescue welcomed 30 birds into their rehabilitation center. Several birds have been found with bite marks from cats and dogs.

Due to Fiona’s heavy winds exhausted birds are resting on roads until they are ready to fly, Swimmer suggests leaving them be unless they have obvious injuries.

She said throw towel over the bird and have a cardboard box ready and put the bird in the box.

Swimmer added as long as there is no broken wing, droopy shoulder, blood, bone sticking out or hobbling its important to give them a call and encourages residents to keep a close eye on the pets until the birds are well rested and ready to fly.

Illusuak Gathering

The Illusuak Cultural Centre in Nain is developing a Marketing Strategy to reach more people in Nunatsiavut and the world. The first step is to hear from the community. There is a survey that community members can fill out, found on the Illusuak’s Facebook page, for a chance of winning $250.

In addition, there will be a gathering at Illusuak on October 5th so people can share more thoughts and ideas. This event will include supper, snacks and refreshments for everyone, and draws for prizes and a $100 gift card for the Illusuak Café. October 5th at 5 p.m.

For those who live far and would like to participate, there will be a Facebook Live on the Illusuak Page at 6:30pm with a virtual tour of the building, so everyone gets a chance to see it, ask questions and share their ideas.

It’s important that people don’t forget to like the Illusuak Cultural Centre’s Facebook Page to get reminders of the event and more information.

Torngat Secretariat

Have any hunters shot a banded bird?

Torngat Wildlife, Plants and Fisheries Secretariat says to report it, or send them the information from the bird(s) and they will take care of the rest for you.

They can learn a lot about Labrador geese by seeing where birds harvested were initially banded.

Just earlier this month, 3 geese with neck bands were harvested and they learned that they came from all the way from their colleagues in Greenland, who put them on this past July.

This helps to provide answers to where the Lesser geese in Nunatsiavut are coming from and with collars that will put this fall, they will even learn more where these geese are spending the rest of their year.

Nain Council Meeting September 1980 (Audio)

There was a Council meeting held in Nain on September 30, 1980.

This meeting was held to present the situation regarding water and sewer hook-up, the collapse of the reservoir and funds for repairs.

A proposal for funds was submitted in October 1979 to the Minister of Municipal Affairs and Housing.

They held council meetings every Tuesday evening open to the public to raise their concerns on this matter.

Click here to hear the news from 1980 on the Nain council meeting.